Are Americans Happy With Their Weight?

Although weight gain has continued among U.S. adults, fewer report trying to lose weight, according to a study appearing in the March 7 issue of JAMA.

Socially acceptable body weight is increasing. If more individuals who are overweight or obese are satisfied with their weight, fewer might be motivated to lose unhealthy weight.

While I hope that each person feels beautiful in his/her own skin and develops the self-confidence to truly be themselves, I am worried that obesity-related diseases, such as cancer, diabetes and heart disease, will continue to increase and take people’s lives at younger ages.

I applaud people for owning their body types and taking good care of their health while not worrying whether they’re a size 14 or a size 4, we need to remember the importance of good nutrition and exercising.

Many people say they hate working out because they haven’t found a fitness routine that matches their personality style.  Take inventory of your likes and dislikes: Do you like your workouts to be social, or do you really want some alone time? What about fast-paced workouts? Or, do you need quiet time to reflect the day’s happenings? Air conditioning or the outdoors? Use the answers to determine what types of exercise to try next.  The only way to find out what you like is to be open and try new things!

As a Certified Athletic Trainer and founder of Fitness for Health, a therapeutic exercise facility located in Rockville, MD, I understand that people like to do things that they’re good at—and express distaste for anything that doesn’t come to them at least somewhat naturally.  So, take advantage of your strengths to create an enjoyable exercise program.

A review published in Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise found that people’s confidence in their exercise ability is the highest predictor of how often they exercise.  So, if you lack eye-hand coordination, maybe joining a rec league baseball team won’t e enjoyable. But, if you have those awesome “mom arms” that comes from carrying around a 30-pound toddler all day, weightlifting might be a fun fitness choice.

Whatever kind of daily exercise you choose – whether it’s kickboxing, group yoga, hiking or creating your own workouts using playground equipment while your kids are on the swings – make it fun for yourself and you’ll keep up with your fitness routine while seeing great results!

Are you in need of fitness assistance?  Fitness for Health can help you create a healthy, active lifestyle while having fun and sustaining weight management.  We offer customized exercise programs designed to fit your and your children’s exact needs while helping you reach your unique health goals. From first-time gym-goers to NFL professional athletes looking for athletic training, Fitness for Health has fitness programs to help people of all ages and abilities reach their fullest potential. And, we offer family workouts and Open Gym playtimes so families can become active together.

Do you want your tweens and teens to get off the couch?  Concerned about their weight management?  Searching for a physical activity where your children will have fun and want to keep coming back?  Fitness for Health’s Healthy Heart class is just the ticket.  Your kids will have a blast while breaking a sweat with our heart-pumping exergaming program.  Using our state-of-the-art equipment, kids will get fit, feel good and get healthy.

This program is a cardio clinic used to help children who are overweight. It is a successful product of our collaboration with Potomac Pediatrics to help improve kids’ health and fitness.

Join the fight against childhood obesity and register for our Healthy Heart program today!

Cure Your Blues by Making a Snowman Today

Although the U.S. has had a very mild winter, the last 48 hours have been especially harsh for a majority of the East Coast with quick snow falls, artic wind blasts and plunging temperatures. But, hope is on the way!

There’s only 6 days left in winter!

Until spring officially begins on March 20, you may be experiencing doldrums.  This is characterized by a lack of motivation, low energy and mild depression that many people experience during this season.

Is there a cure for your Snow Day Blues?  Exercise and athletic training!

Hundreds of studies link regular exercise to a better mood. In fact, according to the Special Health Report from Harvard Medical School, “A review of studies stretching back to 1981 concluded that regular exercise can improve mood in people with mild to moderate depression.  It also may play a supporting role in treating severe depression.”

Any activity – walking, doing the Zumba Fitness Dance Party DVD in your living room or playing Wii with your kids – can help alleviate symptoms, but exercising outside for 20 minutes at least three times a week in the fresh air and daylight is ideal.

Try adding these ideas to your snow day today:

  • Act like a kid again and go sledding.  Enjoy the remaining mounds of snow and burn up to 300 calories an hour frolicking with your kids.
  • Build a snowman with your family.
  • Bundle up and go for a winter walk.  Whether taking a brisk walk around the block with your dogs, taking a stroll to admire the winter wonderland of the woods with your family or taking a reflective hike, getting outside for 20 minutes will elevate your mood.
  • Need a commercial break?  When TV ads rotate between your favorite shows today, run outside and make a snow angel.
  • Instead of eating lunch at your desk, spend a few minutes making your own athletic memory at an outdoor ice rink.  There are numerous outdoor ice rinks that offer one hour lunchtime skates.  Bring a change of clothes, take a few laps around the rink and grab a salad with salmon, legumes and walnuts on your way back to the office.  (Foods rich in Omega 3’s have been shown to moderate hormone levels and help keep moods consistent.  So, load up on “fatty” fishes, edamame, enriched eggs and wild rices!)

You may notice a difference after just one workout, but it can take two weeks for your mood to turn around. Have fun in what’s left of the winter sun!

To learn how Fitness for Health can help you – and your kids – create an exciting, fitness routine while helping with weight management and improving athletic training, visit www.FitnessForHealth.org or call 301-231-7138.

Hormone Released During Exercise May Strengthen Bones

Two weeks of voluntary wheel running induces higher expression of irisin — a fat-burning hormone that is released during exercise — in bone tissue in mice. In addition, systemic administration of irisin increased bone formation and thickness, mimicking the effects of exercise on the mouse skeletal system. The findings demonstrate a potential new mechanism for the regulation of bone metabolism.

The study was led by scientists from Tufts University School of Dental Medicine (TUSDM) and published in Bone Research.

“Exercise-induced irisin may not only act as an endocrine factor capable of promoting the browning of white adipose tissue, but could also regulate bone metabolism by autocrine mechanisms,” said senior study author Jake Chen, D.M.D., M.D.S., Ph.D., professor and biological sciences researcher at TUSDM. “Our results suggest that irisin may have a therapeutic potential in strengthening bone in bone-loss-associated diseases, and additional studies are needed to evaluate the underlying mechanisms by which irisin functions.”

Exercise-based interventions work to increase bone density and reverse bone loss associated with aging.  As the founder of Fitness for Health, a therapeutic, exercise facility working with children through senior citizens in the Washington, DC, area, I have seen firsthand the power of weight-bearing exercise to improve bone and joint health – especially in the middle age population and the importance of fitness for seniors. In fact, we are proud to have created a bone and joint health program for men and women as they age.

Fitness for Health provides a revolutionary, 12-week Bone and Joint Health Program for adults and seniors that capitalizes on weight-bearing, fitness activities.  This groundbreaking program helps to improve posture and increase bone density, strength and balance while counteracting the effects of osteoporosis, osteopenia and aging.

The Bone and Joint Health Program elicits results faster and more effectively than traditional exercise (fitness for seniors) or pharmaceuticals through two state-of-the-art fitness technologies:

  • bioDensity™ – Weight-bearing exercises are the key to stimulating bone growth, and the greater the weight applied, the better the results. The osteogenic loading that patients receive is multiples of bodyweight, and beyond what is typically seen in exercise.  Research has shown, bone density gains that averaged 7% in the hip and 7.7% in the spine over one year using bioDensity (Jaquish, 2013). These results are multiples of what the current interventions can do for bone density.
  • Power Plate™ – Power Plate is a whole body vibration platform that allows for reflexive engagement of the neuromuscular system at rapid and repeatable oscillation. This intervention has been clinically shown to increase balance and stability in both healthy and aging-frail populations.

When used once a week, research has shown the bioDensity system alone has significantly increased bone mass density, stability and functional movement with multiple ages, health conditions and for both genders.

Learn more about how we can help you create a customized fitness for seniors program that counteracts the signs of aging while helping weight management and increase bone and joint health.

Why Kids Need Sleep

Does this sound familiar?  “Turn off the TV.  Shut down the video game.  Close your book.  It’s time for bed…No, you may not stay up for ten more minutes…You say that you’re not tired, but you played in a double header today and your body needs the rest.”

The average child has a busy day. There’s school, taking care of pets, running around with friends, going to sports practice or other activities, and completing homework. Phew! It’s tiring just writing it all down. By the end of the day, their bodies need a break.

Not only is sleep necessary for the body, it’s important for the brain too. Though no one is exactly sure what work the brain does when you’re asleep, scientists believe that the brain sorts through and stores information, replaces chemicals, and solves problems while you sleep. Researchers also believe too little sleep can affect a child’s growth and immune systems.

So, how can a parent encourage good sleep habits in their children?

  • Make sure your child doesn’t eat a heavy meal before bedtime. Snacks should be eaten at least 30 minutes before bedtime to ensure he or she has time to burn off calories and extra sugar.  And, remember, no caffeine or sugary snacks!
  • Warn your child that bedtime is in five minutes, or give him a choice — “Do you want to go to bed now or in five minutes?” But, do this only once.
  • I know that you’ve heard this a million times, but keep your child’s sleep routine consistent.  Establish a consistent and relaxing bedtime routine that lasts between 20 and 30 minutes and ends in your child’s bedroom.  Avoid scary stories or TV shows. It’s better to read a favorite book every night than a new one because it’s familiar.
  • Do some gentle stretching with your kid (be sure not to get her wound up and crazy) right before bedtime. A few gentle stretches and poses may help your kid unwind and relax her tired muscles.
  • Teach your child calming techniques so the worries of the day – or about tomorrow’s test – don’t interfere with his sleeping. If your child has a tendency to worry, ensure homework is done at least one hour before bedtime and that he has a chance to ask you to proofread it.  The earlier homework is completed, the more opportunity he has to ask you for help and the less worried he will be during the night.  Create a nightly study routine and stick to it!
  • If your child comes out of her room after you’ve put her to bed, walk her back and gently but firmly remind her that it’s bedtime.

I wish you good luck and sweet dreams tonight!

Fitness for Health creates unique exercise programs based on a child’s individual fitness goals.  Want to combat childhood obesity with our Healthy Hearts program?  Aspiring to improve your child’s athletic edge?  No problem!  Fitness for Health can you help you and your loved ones reach your full potential.

Are You a Senior? Need a Brain Boost? Exercise

Beginning or maintaining a fitness for seniors program can be a challenge. You may feel discouraged by illness, ongoing health problems or concerns about injuries or falls. Or, if you’ve never exercised before, you may not know where to begin.

While these may seem like good reasons to slow down and take it easy as you age, they’re actually even better reasons to get moving. Exercise can release endorphins that make you feel happier, relieve stress, help you manage symptoms of illness and pain, and improve your overall sense of well-being. In fact, exercise is the key to staying strong, energetic and healthy as you get older.

A study from the Beckman Institute for Advanced Science and Technology at the University of Illinois reveals the connection between brain activation, cardiorespiratory fitness, and executive function in senior citizens.  They found that “Dual-task processing in a core executive function brain region is associated with higher cardiorespiratory fitness and dual-task performance.”

The study states, “The aging process is associated with declines in brain function, including memory and how fast our brain processes information, yet previous research has found that higher levels of cardiorespiratory fitness in older adults leads to better executive function in the brain, which helps with reasoning and problem solving. Higher cardiorespiratory fitness levels have also been found to increase brain volume in key brain regions.”

As you age, regular exercise is more important than ever to your body and mind.  And, it can be fun!

Physical health benefits of fitness for seniors:

  • Exercise reduces the impact of illness and chronic disease. Among the many benefits of exercise for adults over 60 include improved immune function, better heart health and blood pressure and better bone density (bone and joint health). People who exercise also have a lowered risk of several chronic conditions including Alzheimer’s disease, diabetes, obesity, heart disease, osteoporosis, and colon cancer.

In fact, Fitness for Health’s Fitness for Seniors program incorporates state-of-                        the-art technology aimed at maintaining weight management while specifically                      improving bone and joint health.

  • Exercise enhances mobility, flexibility, and balance in adults over 65. Exercise improves your strength, flexibility and posture, which in turn will help with balance, coordination, and reduce the risk of falls. Strength training also helps alleviate the symptoms of chronic conditions such as arthritis.

Mental health benefits of exercise and fitness for seniors:

  • Exercise boosts mood and self-confidence.  Seniors have a higher rate of depression.  Endorphins produced by exercise can actually help you feel better and reduce feelings of sadness. Being active and feeling strong naturally helps you feel more self-confident and improves your self-image.
  • Exercise is good for the brain. Exercise benefits regular brain functions and can help keep the brain active, which can prevent memory loss, cognitive decline, and dementia. Exercise may even help slow the progression of brain disorders such as Alzheimer’s disease.

Do you have an older loved one who could use assistance to improve balance, maintain weight management or better bone and joint health?  We can help.

Fitness for Health is proud to provide a revolutionary, 12-week Bone and Joint Health Program for adults and seniors that capitalizes on weight-bearing, fitness activities.  This groundbreaking program helps to improve posture and increase bone density, strength and balance while counteracting the effects of osteoporosis, osteopenia and aging.

The Bone and Joint Health Program elicits results faster and more effectively than traditional exercise (fitness for seniors) or pharmaceuticals through two state-of-the-art fitness technologies:

  • bioDensity™ – Weight-bearing exercises are the key to stimulating bone growth, and the greater the weight applied, the better the results. The osteogenic loading that patients receive is multiples of bodyweight, and beyond what is typically seen in exercise. Research has shown, bone density gains that averaged 7% in the hip and 7.7% in the spine over one year using bioDensity (Jaquish, 2013). These results are multiples of what the current interventions can do for bone density.
  • Power Plate™ – Power Plate is a whole body vibration platform that allows for reflexive engagement of the neuromuscular system at rapid and repeatable oscillation. This intervention has been clinically shown to increase balance and stability in both healthy and aging-frail populations.

When used once a week, research has shown the bioDensity system alone has significantly increased bone mass density, stability and functional movement with multiple ages, health conditions and for both genders.

Learn more about how we can help you create a customized fitness for seniors program that counteracts the signs of aging while helping to maintain weight management and increase bone and joint health.

Celebrate Your Heart This Valentine’s Day

Roses are red,

Violets are blue,

Are you ready to exercise?

I have heart-healthy tips for you!

Today is Valentine’s Day.  Does the love of your life make your heart beat a little faster and your body temperature rise? So does exercise and athletic training!

By exercising for as little as 30 minutes a day, you can reduce your risk of heart disease by 30% – 40% and your risk of having a stroke by 25%.  Medical research even shows that for every minute of walking, you may increase your life expectancy by seven minutes!

In honor of Valentine’s Day, here are some heart-healthy exercise tips from the American Heart Association’s website:

Make the time!

  • Start slowly. Gradually build up to at least 30 minutes of activity on most or all days of the week (or whatever your doctor recommends).
  • Exercise at the same time of day so it becomes a regular part of your lifestyle. For example, you might walk every Monday, Wednesday, Friday and Saturday from noon to 12:30 p.m.
  • Find a convenient time and place to do activities or fitness for seniors. Try to make it a habit, but be flexible. If you miss an exercise opportunity, work activity into your day another way.

Keep reasonable expectations of yourself.

  • If you’ve been sedentary for a long time, are overweight or need to maintain weight management, have a high risk of coronary heart disease or some other chronic health problem, see your doctor for a medical evaluation before beginning a physical activity program.
  • Look for chances to be more active during the day. Walk the mall before shopping, take the stairs instead of the escalator or take 10–15 minute breaks while watching TV or sitting for walking or some other activity.

Make it fun!

  • Choose activities that are fun, not exhausting. Add variety. Develop a repertoire of several activities that you can enjoy. That way, fitness will never seem boring or routine.
  • Ask family and friends to join you. You’ll be more likely to stick with it if you have company. Join an exercise group or fitness facility. There are even programs specifically for tween and teens to have fun and make new friends while combatting childhood obesity and maintaining weight management.
  • Use variety to keep your interest up. Walk one day, swim the next, then go for a bike ride on the weekend.
  • Use music to keep you entertained.

Track and celebrate your success!

  • Note your activities on a calendar or in a logbook. Write down the distance or length of time of your activity and how you feel after each session.
  • Keep a record of your activities. Reward yourself at special milestones. Nothing motivates like success!
  • Visit the American Heart Association’s website – StartWalkingNow.org – to find all the resources you need to get moving and stay motivated.

Valentine’s Day comes just once a year, but your heart needs daily attention.  Celebrate today by beginning a heart-healthy exercise regimen – not only for your health, but also for the sake of your loved ones.

Learn how Fitness for Health can help you create a heart-healthy and fun, exercise program to reach your personal goals. Whether you prefer EDGE – our athletic training system, Healthy Heart – our weight management program for tweens and teens, or fitness for seniors, we can create a customized exercise program to fit your unique needs.

February is Heart Disease Awareness Month

February is Heart Disease Awareness Month.  So, in honor of Valentine’s Day, celebrate your heart!

Follow these heart-healthy tips to keep your ticker ticking:

  • Don’t smoke or use tobacco. This nasty habit is one of the most controllable risk factors for heart disease. You start to improve your heart health within minutes of quitting. After one year, your heart disease risk is cut in half and, after 10 years of not smoking, your heart disease risk is the same as for someone who has never smoked.
  • Exercise for 30 minutes on most days of the week. Whether you hit the elliptical, jog around your neighborhood or participate in a fitness for seniors class, make your athletic training routine fun!  Play tag with your kids or take your dog on a long walk.  By involving the whole family in your workout, you can spend extra time bonding and creating lifelong memories while maintaining weight management and improving bone and joint health.
  • Eat a heart-healthy diet. Eat foods that are low in fat, cholesterol and salt. Your diet should be high in fruits, vegetables, whole grains and low-fat dairy products which can help protect your heart.  Beans, other low-fat sources of protein and certain types of fish also can reduce your risk of heart disease.
  • Maintain weight management. You don’t have to be super-thin or stick to a rigid athletic training routine to reap the benefits of a smaller waistline, but according to the Journal of the American College of Cardiology, carrying too much weight around the middle raises blood pressure, affects blood lipids and does damage to the heart. Abdominal exercises are good, but remember that it’s calories in (what you eat) and calories out (how you exercise) that will make a difference.
  • Get regular health screenings. Keeping your blood pressure, blood sugar, cholesterol and triglycerides in check are important for good heart health. Learn your optimal levels and don’t skip your annual physical exam.

Even small, steady changes in your life can help create a stronger, more efficient heart.  More than half of heart disease is preventable, and studies have shown that 90% of heart attacks can be prevented by eating a lot of vegetables, fruits, whole grains, fish and legumes; exercising; weight management; and not smoking. And, you’re never too old – or too young – to start thinking about a stronger heart!

Do you need help creating an exercise program that will benefit your heart – no matter if you are interested in athletic training or fitness for seniors?  Learn about our convenient training sessions that can be scheduled before work, during lunch or in the evenings.  We even offer child and teen-specific weight management programs targeting childhood obesity.

Think It, Move It

Have you ever thought about the importance of teaching young children social skills?

Social skills form the foundation of our ability to make lifelong, personal connections.  They are the basis for our home, community and school relationships which tie us to other people.

Now that we are beginning a new year, let’s focus on the importance of school relationships.  School is a great venue where children in preschool and kindergarten learn cooperation, develop friendships, improve self-esteem and establish positive outlooks while ultimately improving kids’ health.

How can you help your child – with or without special needs – improve his/her social skills this year?

  • Smile and initiate conversation. Ask your child to smile and greet one new child each day. Just say, “Hi” while making eye contact.  This is often enough to reduce the pressure and begin some conversations that build toward relationships.
  • Teach your child that conversations are a 2-way street.  Just as your child would like her opinions heard, her new friend would like to discuss her thoughts and feelings.
  • Asking others polite questions about themselves is a great way for your child to learn about his new friend and look for common interests for building friendships. Teach your child how having others talk about themselves is a good way for your child to help others feel important and valued. It also removes pressure from your child because he does not have to carry the conversation. In time, he will begin to feel more comfortable around these students and interacting with others.
  • Remind your child to always be sensitive to others’ reactions. She should not only think of herself but also consider the feelings of others. Remember, empathy begins home and children mimic the actions of their family members.
  • Take risks. Putting yourself out there to meet new people can be scary – for children and adults alike.  Encourage your child to take small steps and don’t be upset if every interaction isn’t perfect.  The important part is your child is trying to make new friends.

On behalf of Fitness for Health, I wish you and your child a happy, new year filled with new friends!

Do you have children in preschool and/or kindergarten?  Would you like them to develop stronger social skills that will help them succeed in elementary school and throughout their lives? Try our Think It, Move It program beginning on this Friday, February 3, and ending on Friday, March 10!

In this program where Fitness for Health is partnering with Sue Abrams, M.A. CCC-SLP, of the Center for Communication and Learning, children will learn and practice core social concepts while on the move. Skills will be introduced in a fun and motivating way, encouraging children to improve their social thinking skills and enhance their motor development. Learn more here.  To register for Think It, Move It, click here.

Does your son have low self-esteem? Does your daughter experience difficulty while trying to make new friends?  Does your child have special needs? Fitness for Health can help your child blossom.

At Fitness for Health, a state-of-the-art, therapeutic fitness facility in the Washington, DC, Area created to improve adult and fitness for kids, you get a complete team—including pediatric fitness specialists, physical therapists and occupational therapists—working together to create a full-service plan of care that’s expertly tailored to your child’s developmental, skill and comfort levels. As a parent, you’re involved every step of the way.

Each plan of care combines evidence-based, therapeutic techniques with our innovative exergaming equipment—from a 30-foot trampoline to a 3-D virtual reality gaming system—to help your child improve his/her motor skills, fitness and self-esteem in the most fun way imaginable. Learn how Fitness for Health can help your child reach his/her full potential.

Is Exercise an Antidote for Behavioral Issues?

Did you know that children with serious behavioral issues “fare better” in school when they are given the chance to move in class and burn off excess energy?

A new study focuses on children and teenagers with autism spectrum disorders, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), anxiety and depression.  Researchers, led by April Bowling, who was a doctoral student at Harvard University at the time of the study and is currently an assistant professor of health sciences at Merrimack College in North Andover, Mass., looked at whether structured exercise during the school day — in the form of stationary “cybercycles” — could help ease students’ behavioral issues in the classroom.  Over a period of seven weeks, the study found it did.

The study states, “Kids were about one-third to 50 percent less likely to act out in class, compared to a seven-week period when they took standard gym classes.”

“On days that the students biked, they were less likely to be taken out of the classroom for unacceptable behavior,” said Bowling. “That’s important for their learning, and for their relationships with their teachers and other kids in class.”

I agree because I was one of those kids.

As many of you know, I have ADD and created Fitness for Health because I wanted to help children faced with the same challenges and assist them in achieving their maximize potential via physical fitness.

Research concurs.  “Exercise turns on the attention system, the so-called executive functions — sequencing, working memory, prioritizing, inhibiting, and sustaining attention,” explains John Ratey, M.D., an associate clinical professor of psychiatry at Harvard Medical School and author of Spark: The Revolutionary New Science of Exercise and the Brain (Little, Brown).  “On a practical level, it causes kids to be less impulsive, which makes them more primed to learn.”

Exercise is essential for everyone – especially children with ADD, ADHD, autism, anxiety and other special needs.  Exercise increases blood flow to the brain and, in the process, stimulates the release of brain-derived neurotropic factors (BDNF) which promote the growth of new brain cells (neurons).  When you exercise, your brain releases chemicals called neurotransmitters, including dopamine, which helps with attention and clear thinking. People with special needs often have less dopamine than usual in their brains.  Therefore, exercise is a vital component of treatment and is something that makes it easier to sustain mental focus for extended periods of time.

If you or a loved one have special needs or behavioral difficulties, the daily demands of school, (home)work and family can seem overwhelming. But, by using exercise as an “antidote,” you can become more organized, better able to concentrate and use your newfound focus to tackle new challenges.

To learn how Fitness for Health helps children and adults with special and/or behavioral difficulties improve their cognitive abilities through exercise, call us at 301-231-7138 to schedule a free tour of our facility.

About Fitness for Health:

Fitness for Health has been recognized as Washington Family Magazine’s 2016 Best Special Needs Program and Best Special Needs Camp in the DC Area and a finalist for About.com’s Readers’ Choice Award for Best Special Needs Resource in the D.C. Region.  At Fitness for Health, you get a complete team—including fitness specialists, physical therapists, and occupational therapists—working together to create a full-service plan of care that’s expertly tailored to you or your child’s developmental, skill and comfort levels while using cutting-edge, exergaming technology. As a parent, you’re involved every step of the way.

Areas of improvement may include:

  • Functional movement / play skills
  • Gross motor function and coordination
  • Crossing the midline
  • Mental processing
  • Motor planning and motor sequencing
  • Eye-hand coordination
  • Locomotor skills
  • Visual motor/perceptual motor skills
  • Proprioception and balance
  • Age-appropriate social skills

Most of Fitness for Health’s exergaming equipment tracks results as they happen, so your child can gain the confidence that comes from seeing his or her performance improve over time. Learn more about our Success Builds Success approach.

Attend our Open House for Prospective Families from 5pm – 6pm on Sunday, February 5, and learn how our therapeutic exerciseoccupational therapy services, and physical therapy services can help your family members reach their full potential.

How to Help Your Kids Thrive in Our Toxic (and nutrient deficient) World

Registration not required but appreciated, info@fitnessforhealth.org; www.fitnessforhealth.org

We know as moms and dads that our children are facing a world different than we did, and the research is accumulating on how this impacts our kids both in short- and long-term health effects.  

Hannah Bradford who is an acupuncturist and health researcher will first provide an overview and case examples of how nutrition, herbal medicine, homeopathy, and supplements can make a big difference in children’s health.

She will then show how various diagnostic techniques such as Autonomic Response Testing (ART) are used to precisely determine the type of foods, herbs, homeopathic medicine, or supplements that children should take for optimum health.

It is these unique testing techniques that take the guesswork out of what each child needs, since many children may react differently to various forms of healing.

Hannah is certified in Biological Medicine through the Paracelsus Klinik in Switzerland and has completed further training at the Klinghardt Academy in the United States. Her training with Dietrich Klinghardt MD, PhD includes Autonomic Response Testing, neural therapy, light therapy, and detoxification and immune system regeneration strategies.

Cost: FREE

Date and Time:  February 28 from 7:30 pm to 9:00 pm

Location: Fitness for Health

11140 Rockville Pike, Rockville, Maryland 20852

(intersection of Edson Lane and Rockville Pike)

Enter 5410 Edson Lane if using GPS

Free Parking:  Enter parking garage from Edson Lane