Can Osteoporosis Be Reversed?

Did you know that 1 in 3 women over age 50 will experience osteoporotic fractures as will 1 in 5 men aged over 50, according to the International Osteoporosis Foundation?  That means more than 8.9 million fractures annually – resulting in an osteoporotic fracture every 3 seconds!

Wouldn’t it be great if osteoporosis could be reversed? Well, maybe it can.

Have you heard about bioDensity™?  bioDensity™ was created by Dr. John Jaquish.  Dr. Jaquish began his experience in life sciences after being told by his mother that she had been diagnosed with osteoporosis.  He, in an effort to help his mother, created a device to place axial loading through bone to safely cause osteogenic loading events. The device was to trigger the effects of high-impact loading, but without the risk of injury. After successfully reversing his mother’s osteoporosis, as part of his doctoral dissertation in biomedical engineering research at Rushmore University, he conducted four years of testing with human subjects focused on user comfort, biomechanics, and optimal musculoskeletal stimulation. Next, the device he designed – bioDensity™ – was put into production, and has since been placed in over 240 clinics worldwide.

As recently outlined in Crain’s Chicago Business, bioDensity™ “exerts force as great as nine times body weight to stimulate bone growth. Patients push against the machine but don’t break a sweat, and the treatment is only once a week for 10 minutes.”

Does it work? Yes.

Performance Health Systems conducted a 12-week trial focused on 60 men and women in their early 80’s and studied the effects of using bioDensity™ and Power Plate on strength (force production), balance, and functional independence at Springpoint Senior Living facilities. The results were decidedly impressive and included:

  • Significant increases in force production
  • Increase of 47-48% for chest press
  • Increase of 50-51% for leg press
  • Increase of 22-38% for vertical lift
  • Remarkable improvements in static and dynamic balance
  • Improved leg strength; reducing fall risk and incidence

Additionally, researchers found that certain types of weightlifting and jumping exercises (when done continuously for six months) improve bone density and could decrease osteoporosis by facilitating bone growth in active, middle-aged men with low bone mass.

“Weight-lifting programs exist to increase muscular strength, but less research has examined what happens to bones during these types of exercises,” said Pam Hinton, an associate professor and the director of nutritional sciences graduate studies in the MU Department of Nutrition and Exercise Physiology. “Our study is the first to show that exercise-based interventions work to increase bone density in middle-aged men with low bone mass who are otherwise healthy. These exercises could be prescribed to reverse bone loss associated with aging.”

As the founder of Fitness for Health, a therapeutic, exercise facility working with children through senior citizens in the Washington, DC, area, I have seen firsthand the power of bioDensity™ and weight-bearing exercise to improve bone and joint health in the middle age population and the importance of fitness for seniors. In fact, we are proud to have created a bone and joint health program for women – and men – as they age.

Fitness for Health provides a revolutionary, 12-week Bone and Joint Health Program for adults and seniors that capitalizes on weight-bearing, fitness activities.  This groundbreaking program helps to improve posture and increase bone density, strength and balance while counteracting the effects of osteoporosis, osteopenia and aging.

The Bone and Joint Health Program elicits results faster and more effectively than traditional exercise (fitness for seniors) or pharmaceuticals through two state-of-the-art fitness technologies:

  • bioDensity™ – Weight-bearing exercises are the key to stimulating bone growth, and the greater the weight applied, the better the results. The osteogenic loading that patients receive is multiples of bodyweight, and beyond what is typically seen in exercise.  Research has shown, bone density gains that averaged 7% in the hip and 7.7% in the spine over one year using bioDensity (Jaquish, 2013). These results are multiples of what the current interventions can do for bone density.
  • Power Plate™ – Power Plate is a whole body vibration platform that allows for reflexive engagement of the neuromuscular system at rapid and repeatable oscillation. This intervention has been clinically shown to increase balance and stability in both healthy and aging-frail populations.

When used once a week, research has shown the bioDensity system alone has significantly increased bone mass density, stability and functional movement with multiple ages, health conditions and for both genders.

Learn more about how we can help you create a customized fitness for seniors program that counteracts the signs of aging while helping to maintain weight management and increase bone and joint health.

Have You Thought About Your New Year’s Resolutions Lately?

Chances are that you created at least one New Year’s resolution.  Did you vow to maintain weight management/lose weight, get fit, eat a healthier diet or improve your athletic training?  We are four months into the new year.  Have you adhered to your resolution(s)?  Or, has your promise already slipped to the wayside?

Don’t fret.  Here are a few suggestions to help you persevere.

  • Start making healthier food choices. Consulting a dietitian for nutrition advice may help. Healthy eating is an essential part of a good fitness or bone and joint health program. A person who works out a lot but does not nourish the body properly could be sabotaging or hiding the fruits of his labor. Dee Sandquist, MSRD, a spokeswoman for the American Dietetic Association, advises having a general plan, and investing some time in advance to make it happen. “Taking five minutes on the weekend to plan your food for the week can pay huge dividends,” she says. “Look at your schedule for the upcoming week, and find out how many meals you’ll be eating in and how many meals you’ll be eating out. Make a list, and then go to the grocery store.”  Planning works regardless of your dietary goal. Some people may prefer to work on reducing fat in their diet, adding fruits and vegetables, watching portions, eating at a slower pace, or curbing junk food.
  • Exercise in the right way. Unless you are starring in a Gatorade commercial, you don’t need to bench press double your weight nor run a mile in under 6 minutes each morning. For the average person, a good athletic training program consists of exercises that work out the whole body – including your bones and joints. A cardio workout improves the function and health of the heart, lungs and blood vessels. Weight-bearing exercises improve your bone and joint health while enhancing the function of your muscles and connective tissues.
  • Switch up your exercise routines. Because bodies are living, breathing matter, they need to be stimulated in order to become more fit. This means exercise is ideally done just outside your comfort zone in order to improve.

Exercise does not have to be boring either. Unfortunately, as people grow up, they lose the connection between fun and movement – “playtime.”  Think about the kind of person you are and what you like to do. Some people may love going to the gym while others prefer to play club/team sports. Still others like walking the dog around the neighborhood or playing tag with their kids at the playground. Getting your children involved benefits not only you by adding fun to your fitness and athletic training routine, but it also teaches your kids the importance of exercise!

If you’ve totally run out of steam when it comes to keeping your resolutions, don’t despair. Start over again! Getting fit is a marathon, not a sprint. No one expects you to change your habits overnight – and you shouldn’t expect yourself to either.

Fitness for Health creates unique exercise programs based on a person’s individual fitness goals.  Do you want to lose weight, focus on weight management as an adult or combat childhood obesity?  Interested in toning your body?  Aspiring to improve your athletic edge?  No problem!  Whether you are a child or a senior citizen, Fitness for Health can you help you and your loved ones reach your full potential.

Can Exercise Really Improve Kids’ Health?

Can exercise really improve kids’ health? Yes!  As little as 10 minutes a day of high-intensity physical activity could help some children reduce their risk of developing heart problems and metabolic diseases such as diabetes, according to a study led by a researcher at Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center and recently published in the journal, Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise.

“The results suggest that substituting modest amounts of vigorous physical activity for longer-duration light exercise may have cardiometabolic benefits above and beyond those conveyed by moderate activity and the avoidance of sedentary behavior,” said the study’s lead author, Justin B. Moore, Ph.D., associate professor of family and community medicine at Wake Forest School of Medicine, part of Wake Forest Baptist.

How can parents encourage their children to be physically from the time they’re born?  In my opinion, make physical activities and games FUN for the whole family!  The key to successful participation is creativity and positive reinforcement as well as scheduling a regular time during the week as “family playtime” so children will learn to emulate their parents.  Families need to work – and play – together to enhance physical fitness while building stronger relationships.  With an integrated approach, parents, grandparents and children can create fun, recreational games that also increase self-esteem – and help families bond – while increasing kids’ physical activity.

  • Celebrate the beginning of spring and get moving!  Schedule one afternoon a week for the family to do yard work together.  (Even if your toddler just plays in the dirt with sticks.)  Studies show that you can burn about 350 calories an hour mowing the lawn or 175 calories for 30 minutes of raking last year’s remaining leaves.  Not only will you get a great workout, your yard will look great too.
  • Help kids read between the lines.  Toby Smithson, RDN, CDE, founder of DiabetesEveryDay.com and coauthor of the new book, Diabetes Meal Planning and Nutrition for Dummies, explains that it’s key to teach kids, even from a very young age, to be food media literate. “It’s important for parents and children to understand food advertising and to take a stand against it by not always giving in to it, Smithson says. Because children are exposed to thousands of hours of targeted advertising for fast food, snacks, and sugar-sweetened cereal, Smithson urges parents to help their kids read between the lines of food marketing strategies. (You can learn more about food marketing and children by checking out Food Marketing to Youth and other info from Yale Rudd Center for Food Policy and Obesity.)
  • Play actively. It’s critical to keep your kids moving throughout the day as much as possible (and to join in on the fun when you can).  Physical activity naturally stimulates chemicals that help clear glucose out of the blood and helps to prevent diabetes.  For most kids, 60 minutes or more of physical activity is recommended daily. (For more ideas to help your kids – and entire family – stay fit, check out Tips for Getting Active by the National Heart Lung, & Blood Institute (NHLBI)).

Do want your kids to get off the couch?  Concerned about their weight management?  Searching for a physical activity where your children will have fun and want to keep coming back?  Fitness for Health’s Healthy Heart class is just the ticket.  Your kids will have a blast while breaking a sweat with our heart-pumping, exergaming program.  Using our state-of-the-art equipment, kids will get fit, feel good and get healthy.

This program is a cardio clinic used to help children that are overweight. It is a successful product of our collaboration with Potomac Pediatrics to help improve kids’ health and fitness for kids.

Join the fight against childhood obesity and register for our Healthy Heart program today!

Tips to Help Kids with Autism Get Excited About Fitness

April is National Autism Awareness Month.  To celebrate, I’d like to take this opportunity to highlight the importance of athletic training and kids’ health in the autism and special needs communities.

A great – and beneficial – activity for people with autism is exercise.

In particular, studies have shown that exercise reduces problem behaviors such as the need for repetition, disruptiveness, aggression and self-injury in people with autism.  And, these benefits can last for several hours during and after exercise.

According to Stephen M. Edelson, Ph.D. in his paper, “Physical Exercise and Autism,” for the Autism Institute, “One of the most effective treatments for autistic people is exercise. Vigorous exercise means a 20-minute or longer aerobic workout, 3 to 4 days a week; mild exercise has little effect on behavior. Many autistic children gain weight if they have an inactive lifestyle, and weight gain brings another set of problems.”

Motivating children can be difficult.  Motivating a child with special needs to exercise can really be a challenge.  Here are a few tips to help your child with autism become excited to participate in a fitness program and improve kids’ health.

  • Create progress sheets/displays. Everyone likes to see improvement.  Create a visual representation that shows where your child began (ie – 3 sit-ups), where you child is now (5 sit-ups) and displays your child’s goal (10 sit-ups).
  • Does your child have a specific interest? Shape the exercise routine to fit your child’s hobbies.  For example, if your child enjoys comic books, create an obstacle course based on a scenario from Marvel’s The Avengers using old sheets, lawn chairs, boxes or even sofa cushions and mattresses.  Pretend Loki has returned to Earth.  Your child should choose his/her favorite Avenger and use that character’s power to conquer the maze and save the planet.
  • Include the whole family. Everyone can benefit from additional exercise so become a role model for your kids by helping them try new activities.  Show them that fitness for kids can be exciting and can be easily incorporated into daily life.  Make fitness fun and teach your kids the importance of a healthy, active lifestyle from a young age.  The younger a child is when this lesson is learned, the more opportunity for a healthy adulthood.
  • Reward difficult exercises with 10 minutes of a fun activity your child selects. I’ve found that the children I train in my therapeutic fitness center for people with special needs, Fitness for Health, try their best to complete difficult tasks in order to have the freedom to choose their own ending activity.  This helps build self-esteem and empowers the child to make decisions about his/her fitness routine.

One of the most important points to consider is how to motivate your child to exercise of his/her own will. Asking your child to continually perform exercises just for a small reward will not last long, but helping your child to find enjoyment in exercise will promote lifelong fitness. This isn’t revolutionary, this is ABA applied to exercise.

About Fitness for Health:

A finalist for About.com’s Readers’ Choice Award for Best Special Needs Resource in the D.C. Region and voted Washington Family Magazine’s 2016 Best Special Needs Camp and Best Special Needs Program in the DC area, Fitness for Health, founded by Marc Sickel who also suffers from ADD, specializes in creating personalized, therapeutic programs for children with a broad range of special needs:

  • Sensory processing disorders
  • Gross motor delays
  • Autism spectrum disorders (ASD)
  • Pervasive developmental disorders
  • Down Syndrome
  • Asperger’s syndrome
  • ADD/ADHD/LD
  • Developmental and physical disabilities
  • Confidence and self-esteem issues
  • Emotional disturbances and anxiety disorders

At Fitness for Health, you get a complete team—including pediatric fitness specialists, physical therapists, and occupational therapists—working together to create a full-service plan of care that’s expertly tailored to your child’s developmental, skill and comfort levels while providing fitness for kids. As a parent, you’re involved every step of the way.  Learn more about our therapeutic exercise, occupational therapy services, and physical therapy services today.

Osteoporosis Affects Men Too

Although women are at greater risk, men can get osteoporosis as their bone and joint health decreases with age.

According to the National Osteoporosis Foundation:

  • Up to one in four men over age 50 will break a bone due to osteoporosis.
  • Approximately 2 million American men already have osteoporosis. About 12 million more are at risk.
  • Men older than 50 are more likely to break a bone due to osteoporosis than they are to get prostate cancer.
  • Each year, about 80,000 men will break a hip.
  • Men are more likely than women to die within a year after breaking a hip. This is due to problems related to the break.
  • Men can break bones in the spine or break a hip, but this usually happens at a later age than women.

Pamela Hinton, associate professor in the Department of Nutrition and Exercise Physiology, has published the first study in men to show that long-term, weight-bearing exercises decrease sclerostin, a protein made in the bone, and increase IGF-1, a hormone associated with bone growth. These changes promote bone formation, increasing bone density.

Unlike sclerostin, IGF-1 triggers bone growth. The decrease of harmful sclerostin levels and the increase in beneficial IGF-1 levels confirmed Hinton’s prior research that found both resistance training and jump training have beneficial effects on bone growth.

To increase bone mass and prevent osteoporosis, Hinton recommends exercising specifically to target bone health. While exercises such as swimming and cycling are beneficial to overall health, these activities do not strengthen the skeleton. Hinton suggests also doing exercise targeted for bone health, such as resistance training and jump training.

I concur with Ms. Hinton. As the founder of Fitness for Health, a therapeutic, exercise facility working with children through senior citizens in the Washington, DC, area, I have seen firsthand the power of weight-bearing exercise to improve bone and joint health in the middle age population and the importance of fitness for seniors. In fact, we are proud to have created a bone and joint health program for men as they age.

Fitness for Health provides a revolutionary, 12-week Bone and Joint Health Program for adults and seniors that capitalizes on weight-bearing, fitness activities.  This groundbreaking program helps to improve posture and increase bone density, strength and balance while counteracting the effects of osteoporosis, osteopenia and aging.

The Bone and Joint Health Program elicits results faster and more effectively than traditional exercise (fitness for seniors) or pharmaceuticals through two state-of-the-art fitness technologies:

  • bioDensity™ – Weight-bearing exercises are the key to stimulating bone growth, and the greater the weight applied, the better the results. The osteogenic loading that patients receive is multiples of bodyweight, and beyond what is typically seen in exercise.  Research has shown, bone density gains that averaged 7% in the hip and 7.7% in the spine over one year using bioDensity (Jaquish, 2013). These results are multiples of what the current interventions can do for bone density.
  • Power Plate™ – Power Plate is a whole body vibration platform that allows for reflexive engagement of the neuromuscular system at rapid and repeatable oscillation. This intervention has been clinically shown to increase balance and stability in both healthy and aging-frail populations.

When used once a week, research has shown the bioDensity system alone has significantly increased bone mass density, stability and functional movement with multiple ages, health conditions and for both genders.

Learn more about how we can help you create a customized fitness for seniors program that counteracts the signs of aging while helping to maintain weight management and increase bone and joint health.

Are Americans Happy With Their Weight?

Although weight gain has continued among U.S. adults, fewer report trying to lose weight, according to a study appearing in the March 7 issue of JAMA.

Socially acceptable body weight is increasing. If more individuals who are overweight or obese are satisfied with their weight, fewer might be motivated to lose unhealthy weight.

While I hope that each person feels beautiful in his/her own skin and develops the self-confidence to truly be themselves, I am worried that obesity-related diseases, such as cancer, diabetes and heart disease, will continue to increase and take people’s lives at younger ages.

I applaud people for owning their body types and taking good care of their health while not worrying whether they’re a size 14 or a size 4, we need to remember the importance of good nutrition and exercising.

Many people say they hate working out because they haven’t found a fitness routine that matches their personality style.  Take inventory of your likes and dislikes: Do you like your workouts to be social, or do you really want some alone time? What about fast-paced workouts? Or, do you need quiet time to reflect the day’s happenings? Air conditioning or the outdoors? Use the answers to determine what types of exercise to try next.  The only way to find out what you like is to be open and try new things!

As a Certified Athletic Trainer and founder of Fitness for Health, a therapeutic exercise facility located in Rockville, MD, I understand that people like to do things that they’re good at—and express distaste for anything that doesn’t come to them at least somewhat naturally.  So, take advantage of your strengths to create an enjoyable exercise program.

A review published in Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise found that people’s confidence in their exercise ability is the highest predictor of how often they exercise.  So, if you lack eye-hand coordination, maybe joining a rec league baseball team won’t e enjoyable. But, if you have those awesome “mom arms” that comes from carrying around a 30-pound toddler all day, weightlifting might be a fun fitness choice.

Whatever kind of daily exercise you choose – whether it’s kickboxing, group yoga, hiking or creating your own workouts using playground equipment while your kids are on the swings – make it fun for yourself and you’ll keep up with your fitness routine while seeing great results!

Are you in need of fitness assistance?  Fitness for Health can help you create a healthy, active lifestyle while having fun and sustaining weight management.  We offer customized exercise programs designed to fit your and your children’s exact needs while helping you reach your unique health goals. From first-time gym-goers to NFL professional athletes looking for athletic training, Fitness for Health has fitness programs to help people of all ages and abilities reach their fullest potential. And, we offer family workouts and Open Gym playtimes so families can become active together.

Do you want your tweens and teens to get off the couch?  Concerned about their weight management?  Searching for a physical activity where your children will have fun and want to keep coming back?  Fitness for Health’s Healthy Heart class is just the ticket.  Your kids will have a blast while breaking a sweat with our heart-pumping exergaming program.  Using our state-of-the-art equipment, kids will get fit, feel good and get healthy.

This program is a cardio clinic used to help children who are overweight. It is a successful product of our collaboration with Potomac Pediatrics to help improve kids’ health and fitness.

Join the fight against childhood obesity and register for our Healthy Heart program today!

Cure Your Blues by Making a Snowman Today

Although the U.S. has had a very mild winter, the last 48 hours have been especially harsh for a majority of the East Coast with quick snow falls, artic wind blasts and plunging temperatures. But, hope is on the way!

There’s only 6 days left in winter!

Until spring officially begins on March 20, you may be experiencing doldrums.  This is characterized by a lack of motivation, low energy and mild depression that many people experience during this season.

Is there a cure for your Snow Day Blues?  Exercise and athletic training!

Hundreds of studies link regular exercise to a better mood. In fact, according to the Special Health Report from Harvard Medical School, “A review of studies stretching back to 1981 concluded that regular exercise can improve mood in people with mild to moderate depression.  It also may play a supporting role in treating severe depression.”

Any activity – walking, doing the Zumba Fitness Dance Party DVD in your living room or playing Wii with your kids – can help alleviate symptoms, but exercising outside for 20 minutes at least three times a week in the fresh air and daylight is ideal.

Try adding these ideas to your snow day today:

  • Act like a kid again and go sledding.  Enjoy the remaining mounds of snow and burn up to 300 calories an hour frolicking with your kids.
  • Build a snowman with your family.
  • Bundle up and go for a winter walk.  Whether taking a brisk walk around the block with your dogs, taking a stroll to admire the winter wonderland of the woods with your family or taking a reflective hike, getting outside for 20 minutes will elevate your mood.
  • Need a commercial break?  When TV ads rotate between your favorite shows today, run outside and make a snow angel.
  • Instead of eating lunch at your desk, spend a few minutes making your own athletic memory at an outdoor ice rink.  There are numerous outdoor ice rinks that offer one hour lunchtime skates.  Bring a change of clothes, take a few laps around the rink and grab a salad with salmon, legumes and walnuts on your way back to the office.  (Foods rich in Omega 3’s have been shown to moderate hormone levels and help keep moods consistent.  So, load up on “fatty” fishes, edamame, enriched eggs and wild rices!)

You may notice a difference after just one workout, but it can take two weeks for your mood to turn around. Have fun in what’s left of the winter sun!

To learn how Fitness for Health can help you – and your kids – create an exciting, fitness routine while helping with weight management and improving athletic training, visit www.FitnessForHealth.org or call 301-231-7138.

Hormone Released During Exercise May Strengthen Bones

Two weeks of voluntary wheel running induces higher expression of irisin — a fat-burning hormone that is released during exercise — in bone tissue in mice. In addition, systemic administration of irisin increased bone formation and thickness, mimicking the effects of exercise on the mouse skeletal system. The findings demonstrate a potential new mechanism for the regulation of bone metabolism.

The study was led by scientists from Tufts University School of Dental Medicine (TUSDM) and published in Bone Research.

“Exercise-induced irisin may not only act as an endocrine factor capable of promoting the browning of white adipose tissue, but could also regulate bone metabolism by autocrine mechanisms,” said senior study author Jake Chen, D.M.D., M.D.S., Ph.D., professor and biological sciences researcher at TUSDM. “Our results suggest that irisin may have a therapeutic potential in strengthening bone in bone-loss-associated diseases, and additional studies are needed to evaluate the underlying mechanisms by which irisin functions.”

Exercise-based interventions work to increase bone density and reverse bone loss associated with aging.  As the founder of Fitness for Health, a therapeutic, exercise facility working with children through senior citizens in the Washington, DC, area, I have seen firsthand the power of weight-bearing exercise to improve bone and joint health – especially in the middle age population and the importance of fitness for seniors. In fact, we are proud to have created a bone and joint health program for men and women as they age.

Fitness for Health provides a revolutionary, 12-week Bone and Joint Health Program for adults and seniors that capitalizes on weight-bearing, fitness activities.  This groundbreaking program helps to improve posture and increase bone density, strength and balance while counteracting the effects of osteoporosis, osteopenia and aging.

The Bone and Joint Health Program elicits results faster and more effectively than traditional exercise (fitness for seniors) or pharmaceuticals through two state-of-the-art fitness technologies:

  • bioDensity™ – Weight-bearing exercises are the key to stimulating bone growth, and the greater the weight applied, the better the results. The osteogenic loading that patients receive is multiples of bodyweight, and beyond what is typically seen in exercise.  Research has shown, bone density gains that averaged 7% in the hip and 7.7% in the spine over one year using bioDensity (Jaquish, 2013). These results are multiples of what the current interventions can do for bone density.
  • Power Plate™ – Power Plate is a whole body vibration platform that allows for reflexive engagement of the neuromuscular system at rapid and repeatable oscillation. This intervention has been clinically shown to increase balance and stability in both healthy and aging-frail populations.

When used once a week, research has shown the bioDensity system alone has significantly increased bone mass density, stability and functional movement with multiple ages, health conditions and for both genders.

Learn more about how we can help you create a customized fitness for seniors program that counteracts the signs of aging while helping weight management and increase bone and joint health.

Why Kids Need Sleep

Does this sound familiar?  “Turn off the TV.  Shut down the video game.  Close your book.  It’s time for bed…No, you may not stay up for ten more minutes…You say that you’re not tired, but you played in a double header today and your body needs the rest.”

The average child has a busy day. There’s school, taking care of pets, running around with friends, going to sports practice or other activities, and completing homework. Phew! It’s tiring just writing it all down. By the end of the day, their bodies need a break.

Not only is sleep necessary for the body, it’s important for the brain too. Though no one is exactly sure what work the brain does when you’re asleep, scientists believe that the brain sorts through and stores information, replaces chemicals, and solves problems while you sleep. Researchers also believe too little sleep can affect a child’s growth and immune systems.

So, how can a parent encourage good sleep habits in their children?

  • Make sure your child doesn’t eat a heavy meal before bedtime. Snacks should be eaten at least 30 minutes before bedtime to ensure he or she has time to burn off calories and extra sugar.  And, remember, no caffeine or sugary snacks!
  • Warn your child that bedtime is in five minutes, or give him a choice — “Do you want to go to bed now or in five minutes?” But, do this only once.
  • I know that you’ve heard this a million times, but keep your child’s sleep routine consistent.  Establish a consistent and relaxing bedtime routine that lasts between 20 and 30 minutes and ends in your child’s bedroom.  Avoid scary stories or TV shows. It’s better to read a favorite book every night than a new one because it’s familiar.
  • Do some gentle stretching with your kid (be sure not to get her wound up and crazy) right before bedtime. A few gentle stretches and poses may help your kid unwind and relax her tired muscles.
  • Teach your child calming techniques so the worries of the day – or about tomorrow’s test – don’t interfere with his sleeping. If your child has a tendency to worry, ensure homework is done at least one hour before bedtime and that he has a chance to ask you to proofread it.  The earlier homework is completed, the more opportunity he has to ask you for help and the less worried he will be during the night.  Create a nightly study routine and stick to it!
  • If your child comes out of her room after you’ve put her to bed, walk her back and gently but firmly remind her that it’s bedtime.

I wish you good luck and sweet dreams tonight!

Fitness for Health creates unique exercise programs based on a child’s individual fitness goals.  Want to combat childhood obesity with our Healthy Hearts program?  Aspiring to improve your child’s athletic edge?  No problem!  Fitness for Health can you help you and your loved ones reach your full potential.

Are You a Senior? Need a Brain Boost? Exercise

Beginning or maintaining a fitness for seniors program can be a challenge. You may feel discouraged by illness, ongoing health problems or concerns about injuries or falls. Or, if you’ve never exercised before, you may not know where to begin.

While these may seem like good reasons to slow down and take it easy as you age, they’re actually even better reasons to get moving. Exercise can release endorphins that make you feel happier, relieve stress, help you manage symptoms of illness and pain, and improve your overall sense of well-being. In fact, exercise is the key to staying strong, energetic and healthy as you get older.

A study from the Beckman Institute for Advanced Science and Technology at the University of Illinois reveals the connection between brain activation, cardiorespiratory fitness, and executive function in senior citizens.  They found that “Dual-task processing in a core executive function brain region is associated with higher cardiorespiratory fitness and dual-task performance.”

The study states, “The aging process is associated with declines in brain function, including memory and how fast our brain processes information, yet previous research has found that higher levels of cardiorespiratory fitness in older adults leads to better executive function in the brain, which helps with reasoning and problem solving. Higher cardiorespiratory fitness levels have also been found to increase brain volume in key brain regions.”

As you age, regular exercise is more important than ever to your body and mind.  And, it can be fun!

Physical health benefits of fitness for seniors:

  • Exercise reduces the impact of illness and chronic disease. Among the many benefits of exercise for adults over 60 include improved immune function, better heart health and blood pressure and better bone density (bone and joint health). People who exercise also have a lowered risk of several chronic conditions including Alzheimer’s disease, diabetes, obesity, heart disease, osteoporosis, and colon cancer.

In fact, Fitness for Health’s Fitness for Seniors program incorporates state-of-                        the-art technology aimed at maintaining weight management while specifically                      improving bone and joint health.

  • Exercise enhances mobility, flexibility, and balance in adults over 65. Exercise improves your strength, flexibility and posture, which in turn will help with balance, coordination, and reduce the risk of falls. Strength training also helps alleviate the symptoms of chronic conditions such as arthritis.

Mental health benefits of exercise and fitness for seniors:

  • Exercise boosts mood and self-confidence.  Seniors have a higher rate of depression.  Endorphins produced by exercise can actually help you feel better and reduce feelings of sadness. Being active and feeling strong naturally helps you feel more self-confident and improves your self-image.
  • Exercise is good for the brain. Exercise benefits regular brain functions and can help keep the brain active, which can prevent memory loss, cognitive decline, and dementia. Exercise may even help slow the progression of brain disorders such as Alzheimer’s disease.

Do you have an older loved one who could use assistance to improve balance, maintain weight management or better bone and joint health?  We can help.

Fitness for Health is proud to provide a revolutionary, 12-week Bone and Joint Health Program for adults and seniors that capitalizes on weight-bearing, fitness activities.  This groundbreaking program helps to improve posture and increase bone density, strength and balance while counteracting the effects of osteoporosis, osteopenia and aging.

The Bone and Joint Health Program elicits results faster and more effectively than traditional exercise (fitness for seniors) or pharmaceuticals through two state-of-the-art fitness technologies:

  • bioDensity™ – Weight-bearing exercises are the key to stimulating bone growth, and the greater the weight applied, the better the results. The osteogenic loading that patients receive is multiples of bodyweight, and beyond what is typically seen in exercise. Research has shown, bone density gains that averaged 7% in the hip and 7.7% in the spine over one year using bioDensity (Jaquish, 2013). These results are multiples of what the current interventions can do for bone density.
  • Power Plate™ – Power Plate is a whole body vibration platform that allows for reflexive engagement of the neuromuscular system at rapid and repeatable oscillation. This intervention has been clinically shown to increase balance and stability in both healthy and aging-frail populations.

When used once a week, research has shown the bioDensity system alone has significantly increased bone mass density, stability and functional movement with multiple ages, health conditions and for both genders.

Learn more about how we can help you create a customized fitness for seniors program that counteracts the signs of aging while helping to maintain weight management and increase bone and joint health.