Want to Slow Down Memory Loss? Exercise

It is inevitable. As your brain ages, memory loss is more common.

Although there is no strong scientific evidence that Alzheimer’s can be prevented, a committee at the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering and Medicine concluded last week that a few common sense practices may help to postpone the inevitable.  They suggest controlling high blood pressure, specific memory training, and regular exercise.

“Even though clinical trials have not conclusively supported the three interventions discussed in our report, the evidence is strong enough to suggest the public should at least have access to these results to help inform their decisions about how they can invest their time and resources to maintain brain health with aging,” said Dr. Alan Leshner, chair of the committee and CEO emeritus of the American Association for the Advancement of Science.

Although the committee believes that the strongest evidence supports memory training, there are numerous studies that recommend consistent exercise to fight the effects of aging and, specifically, memory loss.

“Here we’re talking about modest aerobic exercise,” Petersen said. That includes brisk walking.  “How much? Maybe 150 minutes a week — 30 minutes five times, 50 minutes three times — can have an effect on reducing cognitive impairment later in life.”

Who can’t spare less than two hours a week to ward off Alzheimer’s disease?

As you age, regular exercise is more important than ever to your body and mind.  And, fitness for seniors – and those of us who are baby boomers – can be fun!

Not only is exercise is good for your heart, it’s also good for your brain. Exercising when young and fitness for seniors benefits regular brain functions and can help keep the brain active, which can prevent memory loss, cognitive decline, and dementia. Any exercise that gets the heart pumping may reduce the risk of dementia and slow the condition’s progression once it starts, reports a Mayo Clinic study published in October 2011 in Mayo Clinic Proceedings.

Additionally, exercise boosts mood and self-confidence.  It is a fact that people have a higher rate of depression as they age.  Endorphins produced by exercise can actually help you feel better and reduce feelings of sadness. Being active and feeling strong naturally helps you feel more self-confident and improves your self-image.

Now that you know the importance of exercise for the young – and the young-at-heart, I hope to see you in the gym!

As you age, staying active mentally is just as important as staying active physically. At Fitness for Health, we can help you achieve both. Our unique approach to senior wellness focuses on helping you strengthen and maintain the skills that other workouts often overlook. Learn how our Fitness for Seniors program can help you maintain weight management, increase bone and joint health and improve your cognitive abilities.

Don’t Fall for a Fad Diet This Summer

Happy first, official day of summer!

Acai Berry Diet…Baby Food Diet…Apple Vinegar Diet

Have you heard of these fad diets that promise amazing results with little inconvenience to you or inconvenient for a short time?

I read, “I Tried the Whole30 Diet – And Yes It’s Hard,” in U.S. News & World Report, and was reminded that summer is the main time of year when people try fad diets to lose weight or maintain weight management to look good at the pool or vacation to the beach.

Fad diets, as their name implies, are short-term quick fixes that actually set many dieters up for weight-loss failure. If a diet or product sounds too good to be true, it is.

Unfortunately, there are no “magic” foods or pills that burn fat. No super foods or fitness products that will speed your metabolism to the point where “fat melts away” while you watch TV or sleep.  And, some ingredients in supplements and herbal products can actually be fatal.

Life is already complicated enough. Limiting food choices or following rigid meal plans can be an overwhelming, distasteful task. With any new diet, always ask yourself: “Can I eat this way for the rest of my life?” If the answer is no, don’t do it.

So, how can people keep the weight off and maintain weight management?  It’s simple – exercise. 

Regular physical activity is essential for good health and healthy weight management. The key to success is to find physical activities that you enjoy and then to aim for 30 to 60 minutes of activity or athletic training every day.  Make it a family endeavor!  Exercise as a family.  Play a quick game of basketball after lunch on a weekend, plan a “gardening party,” or take the pets for a walk.  You don’t have to use a Stair Master to get a great workout.  You just need to use your imagination.

If you want to maintain a healthy weight, build muscle and lose fat, the best path is a lifelong combination of eating smarter and getting moving.

Doesn’t that sound better than a lifelong diet of cabbage soup or grapefruit?  I sure think so!  And, it’ll benefit your long-term health and your kids’ health. It’s a win-win!

Learn more about how Fitness for Health can help you create a customized fitness program or athletic training that is fun for the whole family (kids too) while helping to maintain weight management and increase bone and joint health.

You Need a Vacation

It’s officially vacation season – that time of the year when your healthy eating and adherence to a consistent exercise routine to get into swimsuit shape finally pays off!

Are you anxious that taking a well-earned week of vacation will “erase” your health efforts? Scared that you’ll fall off the wagon by eating decadent desserts on your cruise or sunbathing on the beach instead of lifting weights in the gym?

Don’t be afraid to enjoy your vacation!

As a Certified Athletic Trainer and the founder of Fitness for Health, a therapeutic fitness center helping children, adults, senior citizens and professional athletes reach their full physical potential, try my tips to have fun while still continuing your healthy active lifestyle.

  • Take a vacation. Congratulations! You’ve already completed the first step by deciding to relax and have fun! Your body produces cortisol, a stress-related hormone, that makes it difficult to lose weight. It is important to relax and reset your body in order to improve your health – physically and mentally. So, laugh, relax and allow your body to destress.
  • Splurge.  You are on vacation. Now is not the time to ban all carbs and sweets. Allow yourself to sample that caramel popcorn or Key Lime pie – just try not to eat the whole pie! Count your family memories, not your calories!
  • Try a new activity. Do you think that you have to hit the hotel gym in order to work out? Wrong! Make fitness fun. Try adding a long walk on the beach with your family, a surf lesson or a scenic kayak ride into your vacation schedule.  You’ll have fun while burning calories.
  • Stay hydrated. Drinking water helps you lose weight.  If your belly feels full, you won’t be as hungry and won’t overeat and drink sugary sodas to quench your thirst – which lead to empty calories. Also, because the brain is made up of mostly water, scientists have shown that proper water consumption helps you think more clearly and helps to lighten your mood on vacation.  Therefore, it is vital that you try to drink half your bodyweight in ounces of water (if you weigh 120 pounds, drink 60 ounces of water) each day.  Your body will thank you!
  • Rest.  Vacation is the perfect time to take a luxurious nap in a perfectly hung hammock. You deserve it!  Recent studies have suggested an association between sleep duration and weight gain. Sleeping less than five hours a night appears to increase the likelihood of weight gain. So, don’t limit your star-gazing party on the beach. Just ensure you are getting enough sleep by adding a much needed nap.

I wish you a happy – and healthy – vacation!

Are you looking for a way to maintain your swimsuit shape this summer and throughout the whole year?  Fitness for Health can help you build a healthier body by creating a customized, exercise regimen that addresses your unique concerns.  Whether you want to decrease your weight, tone, build muscle, increase flexibility or improve your athleticism, we can help you and your children reach your goals!

Exercise Helps You Age 9 Years Slower

New research from Brigham Young University reveals you may be able to slow one type of aging — the kind that happens inside your cells – as long as you’re willing to sweat.

The study, published in the medical journal Preventive Medicine, finds that people who have consistently high levels of physical activity have significantly longer telomeres than those who have sedentary lifestyles, as well as those who are moderately active.

Telomeres are the protein endcaps of our chromosomes. They’re like our biological clock and they’re extremely correlated with age; each time a cell replicates, we lose a tiny bit of the endcaps. Therefore, the older we get, the shorter our telomeres.

Exercise science professor Larry Tucker found adults with high physical activity levels have telomeres with a biological aging advantage of nine years over those who are sedentary, and a seven-year advantage compared to those who are moderately active. To be highly active, women had to engage in 30 minutes of jogging per day (40 minutes for men), five days a week.

“If you want to see a real difference in slowing your biological aging, it appears that a little exercise won’t cut it,” Tucker said. “You have to work out regularly at high levels…Just because you’re 40, doesn’t mean you’re 40 years old biologically.  We all know people that seem younger than their actual age. The more physically active we are, the less biological aging takes place in our bodies.”

Are you in need of fitness assistance as a middle-aged adult?  Fitness for Health can help you create a healthy, active lifestyle while having fun and maintaining weight management.  We offer customized exercise programs designed to fit your and your children’s exact needs while helping you reach your unique health goals. From first-time gym-goers to NFL and boxing professional athletes looking for athletic training, Fitness for Health has fitness programs to help people of all ages and abilities reach their fullest potential. And, we offer family workouts and Open Gym playtimes (beginning again in September) so families can become active together.

Summer Injuries in Youth Sports

According to Medical News Today’s “Young Athletes: Injuries and Prevention,” James R. Andrews, a former president of the American Society for Sports Medicine (AOSSM), states, “The United States has experienced a tremendous rise in the number of young people taking up sport. Estimates show 3.5 million children aged 14 and under receive medical treatment for sport-related injuries, while high-school athletes account for another 2 million a year.”

“This makes sports the leading cause of adolescent injury. Along with time away from school and work, these injuries can have far-reaching effects,” said Andrews.

I think it’s important for kids to excel in sports and love the simple pursuit of play – while protecting kids health. One of the most important ways to promote this is to reduce the number of kids being sidelined from sports-related injuries. That’s why parents, coaches and young athletes should understand common sports injuries and how to prevent them.

In addition to founding Fitness for Health, a state-of-the-art, therapeutic, fitness facility in the Washington, DC, region, I have been a Certified Athletic Trainer for almost 30 years. Here are my suggestions for preparing kids for athletic training and the demands of playing summer sports:

  • Before playing organized sports, make sure your child receives a pre-participation physical exam, or PPE, performed by a doctor or a nurse practitioner or qualified clinician under the supervision of a physician. Whomever performs the exam, the same practices should be followed including the need for a medical history.
  • Ensure kids warm-up and cool down. Stretching before and after practices and games can release muscle tension and help prevent sports-related injuries, such as muscle tears or sprains, and ensure bone and joint health.
  • Encourage your athletes to drinks fluids (water is the best option) 30 minutes before the activity begins and every 15-20 minutes during activity in order to stay hydrated. Even if the child isn’t thirsty, insist he/she drink water.
  • Know the signs of dehydration. Even mild dehydration can affect your child’s athletic performance and make him/her lethargic and irritable. Left untreated, dehydration increases the risk of other heat-related illnesses, including heat cramps, heat exhaustion and heatstroke. Remind your child that he or she should report signs and symptoms to the coach right away. Don’t let embarrassment keep your child on the field. If dehydration is detected early, fluids and rest might be all that’s needed. If your child seems confused or loses consciousness, seek emergency care.

Would your child like to have an athletic edge on the court or field this summer?  Fitness for Health now offers a unique program that is unlike any other athletic training and performance development program anywhere, EDGE Training!

Most athletes only train to improve their speed, strength, agility and conditioning.  That just isn’t enough.  Our one-on-one and group children’s athletic performance development program, EDGE Training, helps athletes at all levels develop the skills that give them an edge on—and off—the field, including gross and fine motor skills, mental processing and planning and visual motor skills.

React faster, improve hand-eye coordination, think faster and up your game using state-of-the-art exergaming equipment.  Learn more about Fitness for Health’s EDGE Training today!

Do You Have 2 Minutes to Make Yourself Happier?

People throughout the world have practiced meditation for centuries, and it’s quickly becoming one of the most popular pastimes in the modern world. It’s one of the most effective ways to find inner peace, relax and cope with stress.

In AsapScience’s The Scientific Power of Meditation, Mitchell Moffit and Gregory Brown thoroughly explain meditation yields a number of benefits, including the ability to fight (not cure) diseases, increase empathy, and even lead to physical changes in the brain.

Do you think meditation is transcendental fluff? It’s not.  It’s science.

Meditation all starts in the brain with an increase in neural activity in regions directly correlated with decreased anxiety and depression, along with increased pain tolerance. The default mode network, in particular, is activated when the mind is at rest and not focusing on the outside world. This has been found to improve memory, self-awareness, and goal setting.

This is when the silent but active brain begins to undergo physical changes. A 2011 study published in the journal Psychiatry Research: Neuroimaging found it takes up to two months to get a better brain. Participants who were involved in a meditation program for eight weeks had gray matter that was denser in areas associated with learning, memory, processing, and emotion regulation. The amygdala, which deals with stress, blood pressure, and fear, actually showed a decrease in gray matter.

Can you spare two minutes a day to make yourself happier and less stressed? Leo Babauta’s Zen Habits blog points out how starting with a tiny habit is the first step to consistently achieving it. So, start by sitting in a relaxed position and try to clear your mind. (It’s harder than it sounds. Don’t be frustrated if you have a difficult time emptying your thoughts. It takes practice.)

Try these beginner meditation tips from Gaiam, a leading lifestyle brand with a mission to make yoga, fitness, and well-being accessible to all.

  1. Sit or lie comfortably. You may even want to invest in a meditation chair.
  2. Close your eyes.
  3. Make no effort to control the breath; simply breathe naturally.
  4. Focus your attention on the breath and on how the body moves with each inhalation and exhalation. Notice the movement of your body as you breathe. Observe your chest, shoulders, rib cage, and belly. Simply focus your attention on your breath without controlling its pace or intensity. If your mind wanders, return your focus back to your breath.

Maintain this meditation practice for two to three minutes to start, and then try it for longer periods.

Namaste!

About Fitness for Health:

Fitness for Health creates unique exercise programs based on a person’s individual fitness goals.  Do you want to lose weight, focus on weight management as an adult or combat childhood obesity?  Interested in toning your body?  Aspiring to improve your athletic edge?  No problem!  Whether you are a child or a senior citizen, Fitness for Health can you help you and your loved ones reach your full potential.

Exercise Can Prevent Osteoarthritis

Osteoarthritis can potentially be prevented with a good diet and regular exercise, a new expert review published in the Nature Reviews Rheumatology reports.

Researchers from the University of Surrey identified a crucial link between metabolism and osteoarthritis. Metabolic changes, caused by a poor diet and a sedentary lifestyle, trigger’s the genetic reprogramming of cells in the body and joints.

The report states, “Osteoarthritis is the most common form of arthritis in the United Kingdom with 8.75million people seeking medical advice for the condition. This debilitating condition disproportionately affects post-menopausal women who are more pre-disposed to the condition because of biology, genetics and hormones. Currently there is no effective treatment for this painful ailment, with only painkillers available to treat symptoms and no known cure.”

I, along with many representatives in the medical community, believe weight-bearing exercise can improve bone and joint health and thus, prevent osteoarthritis.

“Weight-lifting programs exist to increase muscular strength, but less research has examined what happens to bones during these types of exercises,” said Pam Hinton, an associate professor and the director of nutritional sciences graduate studies in the University of Missouri Department of Nutrition and Exercise Physiology.  “Exercise-based interventions work to increase bone density in middle-aged men with low bone mass who are otherwise healthy. These exercises could be prescribed to reverse bone loss associated with aging.”

I concur with Ms. Hinton.  As the founder of Fitness for Health, a therapeutic, exercise facility working with children through senior citizens in the Washington, DC, area, I have seen firsthand the power of weight-bearing exercise to improve bone and joint health in the middle age population and the importance of fitness for seniors. In fact, we are proud to have created a bone and joint health program for men and women as they age.

Fitness for Health provides a revolutionary, 12-week Bone and Joint Health Program for adults and seniors that capitalizes on weight-bearing, fitness activities.  This groundbreaking program helps to improve posture and increase bone density, strength and balance while counteracting the effects of osteoporosis, osteopenia and aging.

The Bone and Joint Health Program elicits results faster and more effectively than traditional exercise (fitness for seniors) or pharmaceuticals through two state-of-the-art fitness technologies:

  • bioDensity™ – Weight-bearing exercises are the key to stimulating bone growth, and the greater the weight applied, the better the results. The osteogenic loading that patients receive is multiples of bodyweight, and beyond what is typically seen in exercise.  Research has shown, bone density gains that averaged 7% in the hip and 7.7% in the spine over one year using bioDensity (Jaquish, 2013). These results are multiples of what the current interventions can do for bone density.
  • Power Plate™ – Power Plate is a whole body vibration platform that allows for reflexive engagement of the neuromuscular system at rapid and repeatable oscillation. This intervention has been clinically shown to increase balance and stability in both healthy and aging-frail populations.

When used once a week, research has shown the bioDensity system alone has significantly increased bone mass density, stability and functional movement with multiple ages, health conditions and for both genders.

Learn more about how we can help you create a customized fitness for seniors program that counteracts the signs of aging while helping to maintain weight management and increase bone and joint health.

Do You Have to Be Thin to Be an Athlete?

Close your eyes and think of an athlete’s body. Are you imagining six-pack abs, striated calves and rock-hard biceps? Are you envisioning someone thin?

Are you surprised to know that an athletic body is not necessarily what exercise and fitness experts have in mind when they speak of a fit body.  Athletes come in all sizes and shapes, and, in some sports, a successful athlete is not what you might initially envision. For example, a ballerina or a marathoner may tend to be very thin but with strong tendon muscles. On the other hand, a sumo wrestler, power lifter or football lineman may seem “obese” or overweight although these athletes are extremely successful in their sports and are in great health.

This is best explained in “Fit vs Athletic Bodies.” The article states, “Depending on the sport played, the athletic body is built and trained for strength, power, speed, agility, quickness, endurance or a combination of these attributes. But an athletic body that is built, for instance, for an endurance sport such as marathon racing may be severely limited when it comes to strength — particularly in the upper body, or even flexibility. While some sports, such as gymnastics may require the athlete to be proficient in most if not all of these attributes, others have more very specific requirements and therefore the body type of the athlete performing them may not be as well-rounded. An athlete’s body type more often than not reflects the most commonly relied upon skills needed for their sport.”

I recently read, “Plus-Size Runner Leads the Way for Overweight Athletes.” Mirna Valerio doesn’t have the typical body of a runner. In 2008, her doctor told her that, if she didn’t change her lifestyle, she would die. That prompted her to begin running one mile at a time. She now competes in ultra-marathons (100K races/62 miles) but she still hears, “Wow. You are a big girl. Are you sure you should be running?” She also began blogging about “being a runner in a big body” in her blog, Fat Girl Running, and has become an inspiration to overweight athletes.

As an Athletic Trainer for more than 30 years and the founder of Fitness for Health, a therapeutic fitness facility helping children with special needs, adults wanting to regain their athletic edge, senior citizens and professional athletes reach their full potential, I have seen firsthand how being thin doesn’t make you a better athlete and how being a great athlete won’t necessarily make you thin.

Although it is true that everyone – no matter of age, ability  or weight – needs to exercise in order to live long, healthy lives, we need to focus on becoming fit and not just “looking” fit. Fitness should be fun! You don’t need to train like Ms. Valerio and run marathons. But, you need to have Ms. Valerio’s mindset.

She said, “I think most people who are my size and in athletic pursuit, we exude something different. There is a joy in what we do and we love to spread that joy to other people. Especially if it motivates them and inspires them to be athletes.”

And, that’s the goal of being an athlete – finding joy in the pursuit of bettering yourself.

About Fitness for Health:

Fitness for Health creates unique exercise programs based on a person’s individual fitness goals.  Want to lose weight or maintain weight management for adults or kids?  Interested in toning your body?  Aspiring to improve your athletic edge?  No problem!  Whether you are a young child or a senior citizen, Fitness for Health can you help you and your loved ones reach your full potential.

Do you want to improve your athletic skills?  Try our EDGE Training using our one-of-a-kind training regimen utilizing our state-of-the-art, high-tech equipment to give you the EDGE when you need to take your game to the next level.

EDGE Training is so much more than traditional training. We can help increase your visual acuity, balance, reaction time and speed. Want to know how we do this? Contact us at 301-231-7138 for a FREE, one hour workout!

Need an Energy Boost? Take the Stairs

Do you feel like you need a Starbucks break in order to get through the afternoon? Do you rely on caffeine to help you stay awake during mid-day budget meetings? Instead of drinking a Diet Coke to re-energize, try walking up the stairs!

In a new study published in the journal Physiology and Behavior, researchers in the University of Georgia’s College of Education found that 10 minutes of walking up and down stairs at a regular pace was more likely to make participants feel energized than ingesting 50 milligrams of caffeine-about the equivalent to the amount in a can of soda.

“We found, in both the caffeine and the placebo conditions, that there was not much change in how they felt,” said Patrick J. O’Connor, a professor in the department of kinesiology who co-authored the study with former graduate student Derek Randolph. “But with exercise they did feel more energetic and vigorous. It was a temporary feeling, felt immediately after the exercise, but with the 50 milligrams of caffeine, we didn’t get as big an effect.”

As a Certified Athletic Trainer and the founder of Fitness for Health, a therapeutic fitness center helping children, adults, senior citizens and professional athletes reach their full physical potential, I have firsthand experience that exercising increases your amount of energy.  Exercise can improve energy levels by strengthening the circulation and the heart muscle, and in return will improve energy levels. Scientists concur and have found that one of the best ways to beat fatigue and boost energy is to exercise more, not less.

So, the next time you need an energy boost before your Monday staff meeting, take the stairs!

Fitness for Health creates unique exercise programs based on a person’s individual fitness goals.  Want to lose weight or maintain weight management for adults or kids?  Interested in toning your body?  Aspiring to improve your athletic edge?  No problem!  Whether you are a young child or a senior citizen, Fitness for Health can you help you and your loved ones reach your full potential this spring.

Can Osteoporosis Be Reversed?

Did you know that 1 in 3 women over age 50 will experience osteoporotic fractures as will 1 in 5 men aged over 50, according to the International Osteoporosis Foundation?  That means more than 8.9 million fractures annually – resulting in an osteoporotic fracture every 3 seconds!

Wouldn’t it be great if osteoporosis could be reversed? Well, maybe it can.

Have you heard about bioDensity™?  bioDensity™ was created by Dr. John Jaquish.  Dr. Jaquish began his experience in life sciences after being told by his mother that she had been diagnosed with osteoporosis.  He, in an effort to help his mother, created a device to place axial loading through bone to safely cause osteogenic loading events. The device was to trigger the effects of high-impact loading, but without the risk of injury. After successfully reversing his mother’s osteoporosis, as part of his doctoral dissertation in biomedical engineering research at Rushmore University, he conducted four years of testing with human subjects focused on user comfort, biomechanics, and optimal musculoskeletal stimulation. Next, the device he designed – bioDensity™ – was put into production, and has since been placed in over 240 clinics worldwide.

As recently outlined in Crain’s Chicago Business, bioDensity™ “exerts force as great as nine times body weight to stimulate bone growth. Patients push against the machine but don’t break a sweat, and the treatment is only once a week for 10 minutes.”

Does it work? Yes.

Performance Health Systems conducted a 12-week trial focused on 60 men and women in their early 80’s and studied the effects of using bioDensity™ and Power Plate on strength (force production), balance, and functional independence at Springpoint Senior Living facilities. The results were decidedly impressive and included:

  • Significant increases in force production
  • Increase of 47-48% for chest press
  • Increase of 50-51% for leg press
  • Increase of 22-38% for vertical lift
  • Remarkable improvements in static and dynamic balance
  • Improved leg strength; reducing fall risk and incidence

Additionally, researchers found that certain types of weightlifting and jumping exercises (when done continuously for six months) improve bone density and could decrease osteoporosis by facilitating bone growth in active, middle-aged men with low bone mass.

“Weight-lifting programs exist to increase muscular strength, but less research has examined what happens to bones during these types of exercises,” said Pam Hinton, an associate professor and the director of nutritional sciences graduate studies in the MU Department of Nutrition and Exercise Physiology. “Our study is the first to show that exercise-based interventions work to increase bone density in middle-aged men with low bone mass who are otherwise healthy. These exercises could be prescribed to reverse bone loss associated with aging.”

As the founder of Fitness for Health, a therapeutic, exercise facility working with children through senior citizens in the Washington, DC, area, I have seen firsthand the power of bioDensity™ and weight-bearing exercise to improve bone and joint health in the middle age population and the importance of fitness for seniors. In fact, we are proud to have created a bone and joint health program for women – and men – as they age.

Fitness for Health provides a revolutionary, 12-week Bone and Joint Health Program for adults and seniors that capitalizes on weight-bearing, fitness activities.  This groundbreaking program helps to improve posture and increase bone density, strength and balance while counteracting the effects of osteoporosis, osteopenia and aging.

The Bone and Joint Health Program elicits results faster and more effectively than traditional exercise (fitness for seniors) or pharmaceuticals through two state-of-the-art fitness technologies:

  • bioDensity™ – Weight-bearing exercises are the key to stimulating bone growth, and the greater the weight applied, the better the results. The osteogenic loading that patients receive is multiples of bodyweight, and beyond what is typically seen in exercise.  Research has shown, bone density gains that averaged 7% in the hip and 7.7% in the spine over one year using bioDensity (Jaquish, 2013). These results are multiples of what the current interventions can do for bone density.
  • Power Plate™ – Power Plate is a whole body vibration platform that allows for reflexive engagement of the neuromuscular system at rapid and repeatable oscillation. This intervention has been clinically shown to increase balance and stability in both healthy and aging-frail populations.

When used once a week, research has shown the bioDensity system alone has significantly increased bone mass density, stability and functional movement with multiple ages, health conditions and for both genders.

Learn more about how we can help you create a customized fitness for seniors program that counteracts the signs of aging while helping to maintain weight management and increase bone and joint health.